April 20, 2007

Coach stumps for Lumbees

Kelvin Sampson takes a shot

Speaks at recognition hearingKelvin Sampson is one of the nation's most successful college basketball coaches, a highly recognizable face as he roams the sidelines guiding the Indiana University Hoosiers, a storied basketball program.

But Sampson is also a Lumbee Indian from Pembroke, N.C., and, as such, told a U.S. House of Representatives committee on Wednesday that in the eyes of the government he is a “second-class Indian.”

“I used that to motivate me, not deter me,” Sampson said. “The Lumbee people have suffered the same economic disadvantages as other Indian tribes such as discrimination by the dominant society, poor social services and resources and limited opportunities.
IU coach testifies in tribal push for full federal statusIndiana University basketball coach Kelvin Sampson has never doubted that he is an American Indian--a member of the Lumbee tribe.

"I don't need your permission to call myself Native American, but because of the current conditions, I need you (Congress) to validate it. We're Native American, but there is a 'but' there," Sampson told the House Natural Resources Committee on Wednesday.

Sampson said Congress put his North Carolina tribe in that position in 1956 when it made it a federally recognized tribe but denied members access to federal Indian programs and barred them from seeking full federal recognition from the Interior Department.

The Lumbees want Congress to grant full recognition.

4 comments:

russell said...

Writerfella here --
Kelvin Sampson formerly was the men's basketball coach at Oklahoma University and was invited to appear several times at the American Indian Expo in Anadarko, writerfella's home town. He appeared twice but was uninterested in being their Indian of The Year. So, while he acknowledges his ostensible Native identity because of his prominence as a sports celebrity, he may or may not acknowledge it as a matter of personal choice. It now seems that he acknowledges it because, again quite obviously, the Lumbees want to be able to build a casino...
All Best
Russ Bates
'writerfella'

Rob said...

The Lumbees may want to open a casino, but they've been seeking full recognition for decades--long before Congress passed the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act in 1988.

russell said...

Writerfella here --
Nonsense, there is no 'might' about it. They want a casino, no shuck, no jive. Ooh, how Bourgeois...
All Best
Russ Bates
'writerfella'

Rob said...

Lumbee get a win, but not without stipulation

House panel OKs recognition, no casino

The Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina came one step closer to federal recognition yesterday, with a 24-7 vote by a key U.S. House committee to give full recognition to the tribe--provided the tribe stays out of the casino business.

Rep. Mike McIntyre, D-7th, the bill’s main sponsor, said that the vote was a “thrilling victory,” and he said he is optimistic that momentum toward final passage will continue.

The tribe and its supporters said yesterday that they agreed to give up the right to open a casino to improve their chances of winning recognition.