April 27, 2015

Vanilla Ice defends Ridiculous 6

Vanilla Ice Defends Adam Sandler’s ‘Ridiculous Six': It’s Not ‘Dances With Wolves’

By Alex StedmanAfter reports surfaced this week that a dozen Native Americans walked off the set of the comedy because of offensive jokes in the script, Vanilla Ice, who plays Mark Twain in the film, defended it to TMZ.

“It’s a comedy,” he said. “I don’t think anybody really had any ill feeling or any intent or anything. This movie isn’t ‘Dances With Wolves.’ It’s a comedy. They’re not there to showcase anything about anybody—they’re just making a funny movie, I think.”

“I don’t have anything to do with it,” he added. “I just play my part.”

Vanilla Ice also said he’s “part Choctaw,” so he sees both sides of the issue. The musician had previously worked with Sandler, appearing briefly in his 2012 film “That’s My Boy.”

Dances with Wolves wasn't a documentary, you dimwitted "musician." It was a piece of fiction, just like Ridiculous 6.

You've confirmed our point: that movies can and should be more authentic than your ridiculous trash. If Dances with Wolves can do it, so can Ridiculous 6.

Choctaw Nation citizens slam Vanilla Ice's shaky ancestry claimThis isn't the first time Vanilla Ice has claimed to be Indian. In a tweet from December 2013 that has since been deleted, he said he was "Chactaw" and that his grandmother was "full blood."

And last week, he posted a picture on Instagram from the set of the film in New Mexico. He boasted that he was with his "fellow Native's--Navajo, Apache, Comanche, Choctaw. Cherokee."

But citizens of the Choctaw Nation looked into the actor's heritage claims and found them to be without merit. Rachel Byington and Erin Pinder Spiceland researched his family tree and discovered that the "full blood" grandmother on his maternal side in fact was the descendant of German immigrants to the U.S.

"We think that Mr. Ice needs to study his family tree a little more, because we didn’t find a 'Chactaw Grandma' anywhere in it," Byington and Spiceland said in a press release.

"There’s a vast difference in self-identifying as a Native American person and being a member of a federally recognized tribe,” added Alicia Seyler, an attorney who also is a Choctaw citizen.
Comment:  For more on Adam Sandler, see Natives Brave to Protest Sandler and Sandler's Racist Ridiculous 6 "Jokes."

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