October 22, 2007

Pechanga documentary on TV

Pechanga Tribe Continues 125th Anniversary Educational Program to Inform Southern Californians About Tribal HistoryThe Pechanga Band of LuiseƱo Indians will continue their commemoration of the 125th anniversary of the establishment of the Pechanga Indian Reservation and the beginning of a formal government-to-government relationship with the United States by broadcasting this weekend a half-hour documentary video on the tribe.

In their own words, tribal members, elders and government leaders chronicle the history and progress of the tribe to the present day.

“We understand that there are many people who may know little of Pechanga beyond the award-winning Pechanga Resort & Casino,” said Tribal Chairman Mark Macarro. “But we are a proud people who have lived in the Temecula Valley for 10,000 years. Only after an executive order by President Chester A. Arthur did we regain a portion of our lands when the U.S. government created our current reservation in 1882.”

“This documentary begins to describe the journey we have undertaken since that point,” Macarro continued, “and the many challenges and successes that have marked our path. It’s an important part of the history and social evolution of the United States and California, and we plan to share the documentary with a broad audience that includes schools, museums, historical societies, state leaders, and local communities.”
Comment:  I watched this documentary, which aired as a paid promotional spot several times over the weekend.

On the one hand, it was your standard talking-heads documentary. And the Pechanga story is similar to that of many other tribes with casinos. On the other hand, it's a smart move to tell your own story in your own words if you can afford it. Other tribes should take the same initiative to counter the bad press gaming tribes are getting.

2 comments:

O Pechanga said...

Of course, some tribes deserve their bad press. Unfortunately, Pechanga is one of those.

They have destroyed more Pechanga Indians than the white man....

Rob said...

What, because of disenrollment? No, I think the white man is still well ahead in terms of number of Pechangas "destroyed." (I put the words in quotes since disenrollment isn't destruction.)

If you want to discuss disenrollment, go ahead. Give us some hard evidence that disenrollment is about casino profits and not about old grievances or rivalries or something else.