October 23, 2006

Rainmaker returns

If you don't know the history of the GEN¹³ comic book and its bisexual Apache superheroine, read all about it in Rainmaker Returns.

4 comments:

writerfella said...

Writerfella here --
There is some confusion here. A 'bisexual' woman is NOT a Lesbian. A 'bisexual' man is NOT a homosexual. Both may commit Lesbian and homosexual acts, but they also are heterosexual when it becomes necessary. And necessity is the invention of motherhood...
All Best
Russ Bates
'writerfella

Rob said...

I can't vouch for what people write in Wikipedia. You're free to edit their comments if you think they're wrong.

But aren't there a continuum of sexual identities from heterosexual to bisexual to homosexual? Don't the experts say that no one is completely one or the other?

I imagine writer Campbell conceived Rainmaker as a lesbian, but decided it would be more dramatic if she slipped into bisexuality. If her drunken making out wasn't a one-time mistake, it implied she wasn't sure whether she was gay or not.

Anyway, I presume that's why Wikipedia variously identifies her as a lesbian and a bisexual. Campbell confused the issue by modifying her in midstream.

If Anne Heche can go from being a committed lesbian to a married mom, I don't find that too strange. As Wikipedia noted:

Anne said she does not give a label to her own sexual orientation and said "I have been very clear to everybody that just because I'm getting married does not mean I call myself a straight."

writerfella said...

Writerfella here --
You are quite correct, in that humans are sexually oriented by degrees. Imagine a bell-shaped graph or chart; most humans are in the middle ground and therefore are 'heterosexual' almost to 'exclusivity'. That word is used to cover youthful and adult 'experimentations'.
Back in the 1960s, a large university in Pennsylvania conducted some controversial studies into human sexuality. Students and members of the public were solicited individually to see if they were willing to participate in a 'social experiment.' The ones who agreed were told to arrive on campus at a particular building at a certain time. If they couldn't make the exact time, they were to blow it off. So, more or less one at a time, they arrived, were conducted inside and sent into a huge central room. The room was totally darkened but the scientists were able to see inside by infra-red light. The people had to feel their way around and soon knew the room was comfortable, carpeted, and circular. When they ran into other people, they all took seats against the wall in the dark. When finally all 40 participants had entered, they were told one time by loudspeaker that the experiment would last 8 hours, and that was the sum total of their preparation. Shortly, people began talking to one another in the dark. Then they began to move into groups and talk. After three hours, different things began to happen. The people grew intimate with one another, hugging and holding on, stroking and caressing, even pairing off. After four hours, sexual contact began. In the next four hours, every form of human sexual contact occurred: heterosexual, homosexual, Lesbian, multiple partners, three-ways or more, and so on. When thirty minutes were left, the scientists informed the people that they were to leave the room one by one and no one would see each other afterward. People dressed the best they could in the dark, began exchanging names and phone numbers, and then they were taken out the same way they went in.
The 'experiment' was conducted twenty times before the Federal government got wind of what their grants were being used for, and funding was cut off. But the data collected meant one thing: the 'experiment' re-created what must have gone on in caves when prehistoric humans huddled together against the night.
The main result of the 'experiment' was that humans are variant in their sexual orientations, not to the detriment of the reason sexuality exists in the first place. Though there were no children present, it was presumed that they were mostly exempt from that kind of activity by survival instincts.
Gee, sometimes science can be a wonderful thing! And writerfella has yet to write that story as what will be a very controversial piece of science fiction!
All Best
Russ Bates
'writerfella'

Rob said...

I've never heard of that experiment. Interesting.

It seems to reinforce the claims of the museum exhibit noted in this blog. Humans may need darkness to reduce their sexual inhibitions, but animals don't. They apparently perform homosexual and bisexual acts naturally.